hashcat Forum

Full Version: Keyspace List for WPA on Default Routers
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
(07-06-2017, 10:50 PM)fart-box Wrote: [ -> ]I agree about the 'l'. It seems to be too seldom used.

I've been trying to convert those magic numbers your code generates into some form of seed to build a proper pass phrase but I've had no luck.

I wonder how soxrok2212 is doing with his firmware extraction...?

I got caught up in work, sorry. Was also trying to figure out which of the two possible points of interest may be UART but I ran out of time, don't have a day off until next week but I'll try to figure it out in any spare time
Alpha version of the keygen for NVG589:

Code:
pw_charset='abcdefghijkmnpqrstuvwxyz23456789#%+=?'
def pwgen589(x):
  x=int(x*465661287.5245797)
  pw=''
  for n in range(0,6):
   pw=pw_charset[x%37] + pw
   x/=37
   pw=chr(50+(x%8)) + pw
   x/=37
  return pw

Example:

[attachment=506


Code:
>>> pwgen589(0x57c5d9ab)

'596p7=6y6r2a'


As before, 'x' is integer 0 to 0x7FFFFFFF (2 billion options). I'm not yet clear how (or if) 'x' relates to other device attributes.

This only works about 70% of the time because of the rounding during the float multiplication step. The magic number is approximately equal to 1e18/2^31 + 111/2^9 + 2923/2^25 (not certain about the last term.) Depending on the order of operations, sometimes the result ends up slightly off.
(07-09-2017, 10:40 AM)mrfancypants Wrote: [ -> ]Alpha version of the keygen for NVG589:

Code:
pw_charset='abcdefghijkmnpqrstuvwxyz23456789#%+=?'
def pwgen589(x):
  x=int(x*465661287.5245797)
  pw=''
  for n in range(0,6):
   pw=pw_charset[x%37] + pw
   x/=37
   pw=chr(50+(x%8)) + pw
   x/=37
  return pw

Example:

 


Code:
>>> pwgen589(0x57c5d9ab)

'596p7=6y6r2a'


As before, 'x' is integer 0 to 0x7FFFFFFF (2 billion options). I'm not yet clear how (or if) 'x' relates to other device attributes.

This only works about 70% of the time because of the rounding during the float multiplication step. The magic number is approximately equal to 1e18/2^31 + 111/2^9 + 2923/2^25 (not certain about the last term.) Depending on the order of operations, sometimes the result ends up slightly off.

I will modify this code a bit and see if a friend of mine can use his 2.6MH/s and see if it works on my 589.
Give me the first 8 letters of the key from your 589.
b=+#gc5q
That's a 599-type password (my previous code snippet) (some 589s have these) and the complete password should be b=+#gc5qr9gt

https://repl.it/JMbi/4
(07-10-2017, 02:37 AM)mrfancypants Wrote: [ -> ]That's a 599-type password (my previous code snippet) (some 589s have these) and the complete password should be b=+#gc5qr9gt

https://repl.it/JMbi/4

You are correct sir! Fantastic work! I know absolutely no C but from my understanding, if there are only 2.1 billion possibilities, then a full bruteforce is possible. I know a few people who could help me write this in C in order to pipe faster, but it may take some time.
I have written the NVG589 code in C with help from a friend. I have not tested performance with hashcat yet, but you should be able to pipe directly in. https://github.com/soxrok2212/PSKracker/...ster/att.c
Initial tests are interesting.  Between a combination of some pictures I had archived of NVG589's and some listings that can be seen on ebay, I tested a total of 7 devices.

In every case, I could see what the default wifi password was in a picture of the back of the unit.

Of the 7 I tested the results were the following:

4 - password correctly calculated
2 - password almost correctly calculated
1 - not even close

Regarding the 2 that were almost correctly calculated, the passphrase with the exception of the last 2 characters were guessed correctly, but the last 2 characters were wrong.  A workaround is to come up with a rule that can truncate the last 2 characters and brute force positions 11 and 12.  Either that or adjust the code as necessary.

But this is remarkable.  Good work.

Cheers.
Did you test the python or C code?
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17