Founders Edition out of stock
#1
It looks like our procurement  process took so long that founders editions are now out of stock and are unavailable going forward.  We are now looking for recommendations on non-FE cards, specifically the GTX 1080 Ti.   Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

Regards,
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#2
Don't buy an OEM card, that's dumb. Just wait the drought out. New GPUs are coming.
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#3
(08-10-2017, 06:13 PM)IAMPi Wrote: It looks like our procurement  process took so long that founders editions are now out of stock and are unavailable going forward.  We are now looking for recommendations on non-FE cards, specifically the GTX 1080 Ti.   Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

Regards,

You might want to wait as Epixiop has said.  I'm not having a lot of success with the EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti SC2 HYBRID GAMING - the radiator cooled one  (see my post).  My initial testing worked OK for about a week before my first card took a dump.  This second card doesn't work correctly for some reason.  I don't know if it's hashcat or OpenCL under NDIVIA, or maybe the card itself is not a good choice.  When it's running, it screams - when it's running....  But until we figure that out - I wouldn't be buying a boatload of them for mining or cracking
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#4
OEM design cards are garbage. If you don't know why:

https://hashcat.net/forum/thread-3949-po...l#pid22844
https://hashcat.net/forum/thread-4386-po...l#pid24996
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#5
(08-11-2017, 08:36 AM)epixoip Wrote: OEM design cards are garbage. If you don't know why:

https://hashcat.net/forum/thread-3949-po...l#pid22844
https://hashcat.net/forum/thread-4386-po...l#pid24996

A shame too, the NVIDIA GTX 1080 ti runs 3 times as fast as my NVIDIA GTX 970 and at about 50c, where the 970 runs at 75c constantly.  Before I had the issue I'm currently having - it really crushed the hashes.  Interestingly, it works some of the time, but as you say - intermittently.  Maybe the card - maybe some timeout for new firmware that OpenCL  doesn't like.  Can't say at this point.
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#6
Which new upcoming GPU do u mean? Should we wait for them or get 1080ti?
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#7
(08-12-2017, 03:25 PM)duoPRO Wrote: Which new upcoming GPU do u mean? Should we wait for them or get 1080ti?

epixoip is saying wait.  But I'm not sure which ones will be coming out.  The thing is, for the price the 1080 ti, it is a great card, fast, lots of cores, and a bunch of memory.  But it doesn't seem to get along with OpenCL very well.  It's possible they need to just fix their OpenCL version, or add extensions that allow getting around timeout issues and such.  I need to find out from the manufacturer if they have upgraded the dedicated version they use - or are just copying it without matching to the card - most likely that.  I'm not sure I understand the basis for the objection to these cards.  I get the OEM is based on previous versions, and they cut corners, but usually in the process they run regression tests for new hardware and then certify it afterwards before selling it.  It costs too much to do a recall otherwise.  They found that out on the GTX 970 when they botched the memory - I got $30 bucks back on that one.  But that 970 card is a solid card - I have had no issues other than that - still, it's slow compared to the newest 1080 ti.  It would be nice to have a list of acceptable cards - one that has the right model of 1080 on it.
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#8
0. Wait for new cards. We're speculating end of Q3/early Q4, but we don't know for sure because Nvidia is always notoriously tight-lipped about when new products will drop.

1. GTX 1080 Ti gets along just fine with OpenCL, and Nvidia's OpenCL is solid. So I'm not sure what you are referring to.

2. The basis for the objection to OEM cards is that they are garbage. They are designed to provide the bare minimum functionality for gaming workloads ("bursty" utilization for only a few hours per day) and cannot cope with compute workloads (hammering the ALUs with constant sustained load for days/weeks/months/years on end.) They will die a painful, sometimes fiery, death. Keep in mind that I work with GPGPU on a scale that very few people in the world do, and thus I have a lot of datapoints. When I say "only buy reference design", you would be wise indeed to heed my words.

3. GTX 970's memory wasn't botched. The only people that made a big deal out of it are people who don't understand hardware. And the GTX 970 certainly wasn't the first card with this "issue."

4. Of course the GTX 970 is slow compared to the GTX 1080 Ti. You're comparing 1664 Maxwell cores @ 1250 Mhz to 3584 Pascal cores @ 1645 Mhz. 970 doesn't even stand a chance.
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#9
I had the same issue when I decided to upgrade my GPU.  Every place was sold out of the founders edition so ended up settling for a ASUS GTX 1080 TI Turbo edition - this was over a month ago. 

My experience with it so far: it runs fine (touch wood), temps are very good but no getting the same performance as a proper FE - about 5% lower benchmark. I've had it running for 24 to 48 hours with a day or 2 break in between  with no issues. While I can't comment on the noise level from the FE, this one is loud. At 90% fan speed, it runs in the low 60's but is extremely loud.

I'd do as epixoip suggested and wait it out if you can.

If not you can try using the above although I might've just gotten lucky.
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#10
The OEMs with radial fans don't only use OEM boards, they also might cut out the expensive vapor chamber that cools the 1080Ti.
Btw. you can easily spot OEM boards by having a look on pics of the card. Original boards have "NVidia" written right above the PCIE connector. OEM boards have written anything else or nothing at all.
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