Practical PRINCE: 1 CPU + 24 hours = 63% Linkedin hashes cracked, 100% automated
#21
I wonder now how duplicates are handled in prince? For example, for a 4 char keyspace we have: abc+d == ab+cd == a+bcd, etc.
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#22
(02-04-2015, 05:42 PM)justme Wrote: I wonder now how duplicates are handled in prince? For example, for a 4 char keyspace we have: abc+d == ab+cd == a+bcd, etc.

Note that prince is not automatically brute-force. It needs to have a wordlist that contains such 1-letter words to make it one. Still, there are dupes generated. Prince can not handle those cases without loosing so much speed that it would not make any sense anymore.

However if you use prince as it is suggested (using an ordered real-life wordlist) those are extremely rare. Here are some numbers, you can reproduce at home:

Quote:root@et:~/princeprocessor/src# head -1000 /root/dict/untouched/rockyou.txt | ./pp64.bin | wc -l
11074511
root@et:~/princeprocessor/src# head -1000 /root/dict/untouched/rockyou.txt | ./pp64.bin | LC_ALL=C sort -u | wc -l
11068038

In other words, only 1/1710 is a dupe.
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#23
(12-26-2014, 05:54 AM)rsberzerker Wrote: Great tutorial. It would be better IMHO if you included two things:
1) A general explanation of what the princeprocessor is actually doing.
2) The equivalent named pipe for Windows.

Quote:...It takes a bit of experience on how to prepare/filter the input wordlist...
A tutorial or at least some words of wisdom on this would be much appreciated too.
[/quote]

Is it possible to have more information  on how filters are expressed  when using the princeprocessor?  I am trying to use princeprocessor  to extract  passwords from rockyou.txt that follow a particular pattern  such as length,  position of lower case, upper case, etc.
Thanks
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