Understanding speed-only
#1
Hello,

1. What factors are considered for determining speed? (Atleast high level idea will be enough for me, like RAM etc?)
2.  In the attached image, does it mean that my machine can calculate 392.9 Million hashes/second?
3. What does the 7.12 ms in bracket signify?


Attached Files
.png   speedonly.PNG (Size: 4.75 KB / Downloads: 17)
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#2
(04-19-2017, 04:38 AM)ytbe.use3 Wrote: Hello,

1. What factors are considered for determining speed? (Atleast high level idea will be enough for me, like RAM etc?)
2.  In the attached image, does it mean that my machine can calculate 392.9 Million hashes/second?
3. What does the 7.12 ms in bracket signify?

which means attached keyspace should be running on my machine in less than one second (308 million) but thats not the case. It takes very long time.

What am I understanding wrong?

My use case: I am using hashcat distributively and want to display user an estimated time for the cracking process. I am writing it in golang and am not able to interact with the hashcat while it is running (so I am not able to parse the time estimated etc. in runtime and will only see the results after the command execution is done), so I am planning to calculate the --speed-only and then divide the number of hashes (limit-skip) and then divide them (speed and limit-skip value) to provide user an estimated time for the cracking process.


Attached Files
.png   keyspace.PNG (Size: 2.15 KB / Downloads: 18)
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#3
I don't know what that number shows, but it's definitly not the keyspace of your work. That's 26^9=5429503678976 ~5.5 trillion.
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#4
Note that --keyspace does not return the entire keyspace in case you're cracking fast hashes. It's only the base count, the amplifiers are left out and run inside the kernel. The "ms" count is the time it takes to calculate a specific set of workload. It's important to hold it below some threshold, otherwise the OS falsely thinks the driver has crashed and resets it.
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